My English Othello Assignment: Hidden Scene and Sonnet

Hi all, I have a creative response to Shakespeare’s Othello I’d like to share. I’d appreciate any feedback, thanks!!!

 

Othello Sonnet, Act One Scene Three

 

I hath done nought to be condemned to thou,

Nor thy affairs of the patriarch State.

Me, forced to be witness to torment and how,

My lover with my father birthed their hate.

Grieving in self-pity masked in sorrow,

Whilst Othello spoke of our harmony,

Tears of the great green beast he put for show.

Behind him was only lonely money.

But alas, his status was all to him,

Higher t’was than the love of his daughter.

Or t’was on unjust policy he dimmed,

His slight of my being, not who “ought her”.

  • Yet for every mark he made on their kin,

My end may’ve come by my lover’s sin.

 

 

Written by Darsh Chauhan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Othello Creative Response Assessment Task Draft

Act V Scene III

Cyprus: Desdemona’s bedchamber

Enter Iago, bound in chains

IAGO [to himself]          And yet my chance hath not escaped me.

 

IAGO [crying loudly]            Tis most curséd fate! Thy who hath learned,

that not to be honest was in fact to be wise,

as seen and smelt and heard and felt by the Moor,

was masked under hate and jealousy,

whose solitary occupant was him.

 

Oh, take heed- if anyone be near

I cry from the bottom of my hurt heart,

I am sorry for the unfolded events,

Though I must conceal with great caution,

T’was never me who hath lied to thee,

But instead dishonest Emilia,

That harlot so claiming to be mine wife.

They do not call me ‘honest’ for no reason,

And I beg of thee all to listen,

And to forgive with gratitude and peace.

 

My wife, Emilia, hath made the foul call to you all,

By torturing Othello with their romance,

She hath forced death upon him and his wife.

She could not bear the guilt, nor the sorrow,

And placed this heavy weight on his shoulders,

Which were burdened as it already was.

Then he consoled me, as people oft do,

And out of confusion, out of hate, out of misery,

Othello did to Desdemona,

The deed he dared to do to himself.

 

And yet I am left. I am here,

Standing, bound, watching, waiting for you to come,

To understand and to realise,

What bad fate hath come to the people of Cyprus.

So come. Here me now, and come.

 

 

Enter lodovico and cassio

CASSIO               We hath heard thee. Our swords now be abolished from thy sight,

But not without caution, and hesitation.

LODOVICO                     Indeed, for when the Moor is lost, then all is lost,

And this palace will never be the same.

So let us mourn, let us pray, let us forgive

All that hath happened, and all that is to come.

IAGO                                             I could not agree any more. We must

Learn to grow and live, and recover from this.

CASSIO                                           Come Lodovico, let us release him.

Iago hath maintained honesty,

And love, and sacrifice amongst us.

Let this act of miscommunication

Rest in these chains as we dispose of them,

And all the pain that they hath caused us all.

LODOVICO                                                              Indeed.

 

They release Iago from his chains.

 

Come, my brothers, for we are left for Cyprus,

And Cyprus is left for us.

 

IAGO                                     Excuse me for one moment my good friends,

I have much to ponder on after today.

I will be out with you in a jiffy.

 

Exit LODOVICO  and CASSIO

 

A few moments later;

Enter BIANCA

BIANCA                                           Dear Iago, how do you fare?

Hath Cassio and Lodovico bade you bye?

IAGO                                                              Indeed they hath.

BIANCA                            What content have you made them aware of?

IAGO                                 Nothing any more or less than we hath discussed.

Dear my golden angel Bianca,

It is not many people who be aware

That t’is you and t’is me who hath foiled

The intentions of the infidel Moor.

Even now, Lodovico and Cassio,

Those two, poor and ignorant souls

Believe in my innocence, and only seek

The restoration of torn Cyprus,

Only with a sparkling crown on their heads.

Oh, dear, how greed, even now,

Troubles the good souls of the ambitious,

And optimistically bound soldiers

Of this already fallen State.

 

Come, my dear, for you hath done well,

In clouding the hazéd judgement to darkness

Of the once-valiant Cassio,

Who hath never, never been worthy

Of the position of lieutenant.

Of my position as lieutenant.

BIANCA                            T’was only you who hath carried out this master plan,

My brave and dearest Iago. I did but my part.

IAGO                                 You are more generous than you were, it seems.

Yet come now, my dear Bianca.

Come, for we have a State to rule.

 

Exeunt

Word Count: 610 words

 

Written Explanation

The above hidden scene was written in conjunction with the conclusion of Shakespeare’s Othello. The main concept behind this scene was to give some, but not absolute, indication of Iago’s motives for his actions throughout the course of the play. At no point, in either the play or this scene, are his motives explicitly revealed; instead they are delivered to the reader in such a way that he/she may interpret them in his/her own way. Iago’s deceitful character is upheld in this scene as he continues to lie to Cassio and Lodovico, as the reader finds out that he and Bianca had been planning Othello’s death for a long time. At some points in the scene, some internal rhyme has been implemented (e.g. as seen and smelt and heard and felt). This is to show the reader sensory judgement, and the repetition of and aids in illustrating the line’s significance. The decision to write the scene in Middle English was reached as it adds an element of realism to the scene and picks up accurately from when the play ended. Some other literary devices incorporated in the scene are assonance/alliteration (The intentions of the infidel Moor). There have also been some thematic references in the scene (greed…troubles the souls). This is to highlight greed as an underlying theme in the play; Brabantio’s view of Desdemona as property, Iago’s jealousy is motivated by his strong desire for the lieutenant position, etc. A vast majority of the incentives for the major events in the play are motivated by greed, and it is made to appear ironic that Iago reflects on this in Cassio and Lodovico’s desire for the attainment of Cyprus, when in fact, he is the antagonist. Conclusively, this scene gives some insight into thought process of Iago after the dramatic final scene as well as the unseen yet critical role of Bianca in the play.

 

Word Count: 302 words

 

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